NOTE: This project is underway. Thank you for your interest and patience.
The documentary series "Divisible" explores the national policy of redlining using Omaha, Nebraska, as a case study to understand how redlining impacted people of color and why it remains relevant today. Redlining, which officially began in 1934, designated specific areas of cities to receive financial support - e.g., federally-supported home mortgage loans -  and expressly excluded other areas, implicitly targeting them for disinvestment and decline. This targeting reflected a long history of racism. Disfavored neighborhoods - the 'redlined areas' - were overwhelmingly populated by people of color. The resulting disinvestment exacerbated pre-existing education, health, economic, and criminal justice disparities. While redlining as government policy was ultimately declared illegal and banned in 1968, the harmful impacts remain clearly evident to this day and many of the practices continue informally today.
Yet most Americans do not know what 'redlining' means, much less its powerful and persistent implications. This lack of understanding about redlining skews many Americans' perceptions of various socioeconomic disparities past and present. This series aims to build awareness of the historical context that precipitated redlining, and the ways redlining’s effects are still felt to this day.
Few schools teach students about redlining. Every morning those students are instructed to put their hand over their heart and pledge allegiance to "one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all." But those who understand the policy know that  redlining expressly countered the very idea of America as an indivisible nation. Elected leaders and judges flouted their responsibility to protect “liberty and justice for all,” rendering this nation divisible - evidenced by these maps.
To learn more, please visit divisibledoc.com
Below is a teaser for the series, as a preview of what is to come.
The images below were taken in Omaha, NE, during the 3 weeks spent filming there.
North Omaha, considered the inner-city of Omaha, is populated mainly by people of color (who make up 71% of the areas residents), as opposed to the city as a whole, where people of color are less than 27% of the overall population.
North Omaha, considered the inner-city of Omaha, is populated mainly by people of color (who make up 71% of the areas residents), as opposed to the city as a whole, where people of color are less than 27% of the overall population.
In every major city across the country, highways and interstates rip through Black and brown communities, severing the social fabric and economic lifeline of many of these areas. Highway 75, pictured, was constructed through the heart of the Black community in Omaha, splitting the existing neighborhood in half,  displacing 1,100 households and nearly 3,000 people. That population still has not been recovered, the effects of  which have reverberated throughout the makeup socioeconomic of the area.
In every major city across the country, highways and interstates rip through Black and brown communities, severing the social fabric and economic lifeline of many of these areas. Highway 75, pictured, was constructed through the heart of the Black community in Omaha, splitting the existing neighborhood in half, displacing 1,100 households and nearly 3,000 people. That population still has not been recovered, the effects of which have reverberated throughout the makeup socioeconomic of the area.
24th & Lake Street is the most famous historic district in North Omaha, once called the "Black Wall Street" of the midwest. Residents who grew up here recount a thriving, integrated business district, surrounded by homes and families of varying backgrounds. However, following decades of redlining policies and disinvestment in the area, this historic district today has over 100 vacant lots, surrounded by foreclosed and dilapidated homes.
24th & Lake Street is the most famous historic district in North Omaha, once called the "Black Wall Street" of the midwest. Residents who grew up here recount a thriving, integrated business district, surrounded by homes and families of varying backgrounds. However, following decades of redlining policies and disinvestment in the area, this historic district today has over 100 vacant lots, surrounded by foreclosed and dilapidated homes.
During the Great Migration of the twentieth century, many Black families moved to Omaha for work. Coming largely from the south, the type of work most familiar to them was similar to the work they found in the Omaha packing houses. While these industries provided employment to numerous families in the North and South Omaha communities for several decades, these factories and plants largely moved their business overseas in the 1980s as mass deindustrialization took over large portions of the Midwest.
During the Great Migration of the twentieth century, many Black families moved to Omaha for work. Coming largely from the south, the type of work most familiar to them was similar to the work they found in the Omaha packing houses. While these industries provided employment to numerous families in the North and South Omaha communities for several decades, these factories and plants largely moved their business overseas in the 1980s as mass deindustrialization took over large portions of the Midwest.
Approximately fifteen miles westward lies West Omaha, the most affluent part of the city. Overwhelmingly populated by white residents, this geographic region is less densely populated and has a median household income $24,000 higher than the city average.
Approximately fifteen miles westward lies West Omaha, the most affluent part of the city. Overwhelmingly populated by white residents, this geographic region is less densely populated and has a median household income $24,000 higher than the city average.
Most residents of West Omaha live in single-family homes, with the average home valued at nearly $300,000 - over $100,000 higher than the city average. "West O", as referred to by some locals, is home to the largest number of shopping malls, restaurants, amenities, health care institutions, and private schools in the city.
Most residents of West Omaha live in single-family homes, with the average home valued at nearly $300,000 - over $100,000 higher than the city average. "West O", as referred to by some locals, is home to the largest number of shopping malls, restaurants, amenities, health care institutions, and private schools in the city.
While North Omaha is not officially recognized as a food desert, the reality for most of its residents indicates otherwise. Fast food options severely outnumber health food options in North Omaha. Residents must either drive long distances or take inefficient public transport several miles from their homes to obtain fresh produce and healthy meal options for their families.
While North Omaha is not officially recognized as a food desert, the reality for most of its residents indicates otherwise. Fast food options severely outnumber health food options in North Omaha. Residents must either drive long distances or take inefficient public transport several miles from their homes to obtain fresh produce and healthy meal options for their families.
North Omaha is home to small, locally owned, and independent businesses. While some of these locally owned businesses have been able to sustain themselves throughout purposeful geographic disinvestment, many businesses have had to close their doors due to economic hardship.
North Omaha is home to small, locally owned, and independent businesses. While some of these locally owned businesses have been able to sustain themselves throughout purposeful geographic disinvestment, many businesses have had to close their doors due to economic hardship.
North Omaha is home to small, locally owned, and independent businesses. While some of these locally owned businesses have been able to sustain themselves throughout purposeful geographic disinvestment, many businesses have had to close their doors due to economic hardship.
North Omaha is home to small, locally owned, and independent businesses. While some of these locally owned businesses have been able to sustain themselves throughout purposeful geographic disinvestment, many businesses have had to close their doors due to economic hardship.
One out of three Black families in Omaha live in poverty. A majority of those families are located in North Omaha.
One out of three Black families in Omaha live in poverty. A majority of those families are located in North Omaha.
Basketball is a cultural staple throughout North Omaha. In North Omaha, most courts are made of concrete, which is harder on joints than the indoor wooden courts often found in West Omaha.
Basketball is a cultural staple throughout North Omaha. In North Omaha, most courts are made of concrete, which is harder on joints than the indoor wooden courts often found in West Omaha.
While basketball courts are the most common form of outdoor recreational facilities in North Omaha, one can find a few baseball fields and tennis courts as well.
While basketball courts are the most common form of outdoor recreational facilities in North Omaha, one can find a few baseball fields and tennis courts as well.
The majority of outdoor recreation venues in West Omaha are tennis courts, golf courses, and baseball fields.
The majority of outdoor recreation venues in West Omaha are tennis courts, golf courses, and baseball fields.
The majority of outdoor recreation venues in West Omaha are tennis courts, golf courses, and baseball fields.
The majority of outdoor recreation venues in West Omaha are tennis courts, golf courses, and baseball fields.

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